Comments for Steph's E-learning and Digital Cultures Blog http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec part of the MSc in E-learning at the University of Edinburgh Sun, 11 Dec 2011 23:06:37 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.1.1 Comment on Posthuman Pedagogy by Steph Cronin http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/2011/11/27/posthuman-pedagogy/#comment-76 Steph Cronin Sun, 11 Dec 2011 23:06:37 +0000 http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/?p=100#comment-76 Thank you all for your comments. They have certainly helped develop my understanding and spurred on some critical thinking that I hope to carry over into the assignment. Firstly, Sian – great book recommendation! It is even written in a way that complements the way in which I think…or at least the way I think, that I think. Kevin – your comments are very welcome and spot on. They are very really concerns that I have been grappling with when exploring this topic. Such concerns occur with increasing frequency as we encounter posthumanism powering into healthcare. However, in a similar fashion as the laser may be used to create utopia or dystopia (referenced in my block 1 posts re: Robert Winston ‘Bads Idea’s’) potential opportunities to improve patient care should not missed by fear of ‘what if’s’ but instead a beneficent approach need be adopted. One point to answer 'what if the computer decides the patterns don't match...tries to correct through (unneeded) defibrillations' is that, this is already occurring. Though not a computer as some devices can malfunction or be set over/under sensitive thus delivering an inappropriate impulse. Many occasional occurrences are rarely catastrophic (sometimes a completely asymptomatic event). The wireless technology enables the physician to be aware of these 'warnings' and adjust the settings before a catastrophic event occurs. Perhaps the ‘fail-safe’ within my pedagogy is that the physician (as human) retains ultimate responsibility for the patients’ wellbeing and can choose to ‘revert’ to human interaction if deemed necessary...expediting a f2f meeting early than a routine appointment if the reprogramming is complex and high risk. Utilising the posthuman facilitates monitoring and potential treatment to be delivered over and above what is achievable by human means alone. You raised an interesting concern regarding hackability. This certainly could be catastrophic in terms of patient safety but also in terms of leaking confidential patient data that has an effect on a patient’s social, professional and financial wellbeing. The technical prowess required to address this is far beyond my capabilities. However, I do appreciate that this needs significant consideration and action to prevent such an event…perhaps regarded as a post-posthuman action. Thank you all for your comments. They have certainly helped develop my understanding and spurred on some critical thinking that I hope to carry over into the assignment.
Firstly, Sian – great book recommendation! It is even written in a way that complements the way in which I think…or at least the way I think, that I think.
Kevin – your comments are very welcome and spot on. They are very really concerns that I have been grappling with when exploring this topic. Such concerns occur with increasing frequency as we encounter posthumanism powering into healthcare. However, in a similar fashion as the laser may be used to create utopia or dystopia (referenced in my block 1 posts re: Robert Winston ‘Bads Idea’s’) potential opportunities to improve patient care should not missed by fear of ‘what if’s’ but instead a beneficent approach need be adopted. One point to answer ‘what if the computer decides the patterns don’t match…tries to correct through (unneeded) defibrillations’ is that, this is already occurring. Though not a computer as some devices can malfunction or be set over/under sensitive thus delivering an inappropriate impulse. Many occasional occurrences are rarely catastrophic (sometimes a completely asymptomatic event). The wireless technology enables the physician to be aware of these ‘warnings’ and adjust the settings before a catastrophic event occurs. Perhaps the ‘fail-safe’ within my pedagogy is that the physician (as human) retains ultimate responsibility for the patients’ wellbeing and can choose to ‘revert’ to human interaction if deemed necessary…expediting a f2f meeting early than a routine appointment if the reprogramming is complex and high risk. Utilising the posthuman facilitates monitoring and potential treatment to be delivered over and above what is achievable by human means alone. You raised an interesting concern regarding hackability. This certainly could be catastrophic in terms of patient safety but also in terms of leaking confidential patient data that has an effect on a patient’s social, professional and financial wellbeing. The technical prowess required to address this is far beyond my capabilities. However, I do appreciate that this needs significant consideration and action to prevent such an event…perhaps regarded as a post-posthuman action.

]]>
Comment on Posthuman Pedagogy by Kevin Shawn HUDSON http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/2011/11/27/posthuman-pedagogy/#comment-66 Kevin Shawn HUDSON Wed, 07 Dec 2011 20:30:46 +0000 http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/?p=100#comment-66 Very interesting. I'd like to play devil's advocate for a moment and ask about the fail-safes built into the system. If a physician can log in and "remotely alter the function of the device to increase functioning of the heart," couldn't they also do nefarious damage to it? Can the system be hacked? Is it difficult to imagine the maintenance of all of the patients becoming a burden on the physician's time, therefore the task is outsourced to a (perhaps) less educated technician who simply looks for patterns. Once this happens, why not use a computer program to do it, since computers are more efficient at monitoring patterns? But then, what if the computer decides your particular pattern doesn't match, and therefore tries to correct it through (unneeded) defibrillations? If the patient has less and less contact with the physician, and starts relying on the technology through an app, are we putting too much faith in the machine? Cost cutting aside, are you ready to turn over remote control of your heart to someone else, without structured support? Very interesting. I’d like to play devil’s advocate for a moment and ask about the fail-safes built into the system. If a physician can log in and “remotely alter the function of the device to increase functioning of the heart,” couldn’t they also do nefarious damage to it? Can the system be hacked?

Is it difficult to imagine the maintenance of all of the patients becoming a burden on the physician’s time, therefore the task is outsourced to a (perhaps) less educated technician who simply looks for patterns. Once this happens, why not use a computer program to do it, since computers are more efficient at monitoring patterns? But then, what if the computer decides your particular pattern doesn’t match, and therefore tries to correct it through (unneeded) defibrillations?

If the patient has less and less contact with the physician, and starts relying on the technology through an app, are we putting too much faith in the machine? Cost cutting aside, are you ready to turn over remote control of your heart to someone else, without structured support?

]]>
Comment on Posthuman Pedagogy by Grace Elliott http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/2011/11/27/posthuman-pedagogy/#comment-50 Grace Elliott Mon, 28 Nov 2011 16:50:59 +0000 http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/?p=100#comment-50 Interesting stuff Steph. It would be very reassuring for the person to know that their doctor is able to remotely monitor the device and make any alterations s(h)e sees fit. I know I’d find it comforting. Great idea about the apps and after-care treatment too. Do you think though that these technologies are accessible to all? I think there are probably a lot of ‘cyborgs’ around - may be the word needs redefined. I think my daughter would find your blog interesting so I’m going to post her the link. She’s training to be a consultant anaesthetist. Interesting stuff Steph. It would be very reassuring for the person to know that their doctor is able to remotely monitor the device and make any alterations s(h)e sees fit. I know I’d find it comforting. Great idea about the apps and after-care treatment too. Do you think though that these technologies are accessible to all?

I think there are probably a lot of ‘cyborgs’ around – may be the word needs redefined.

I think my daughter would find your blog interesting so I’m going to post her the link. She’s training to be a consultant anaesthetist.

]]>
Comment on Posthuman Pedagogy by Jeremy Keith Knox http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/2011/11/27/posthuman-pedagogy/#comment-49 Jeremy Keith Knox Mon, 28 Nov 2011 14:41:04 +0000 http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/?p=100#comment-49 This is a fascinating technology Steph, and one that definitely questions the boundaries of the individual. It seems that, in allowing ‘the physician to monitor the patients and remotely alter the function of the device to increase functioning of the heart’, control of the body (previously allocated to the individuals brain stem?) is being ‘outsourced’ to a system that includes the device, and the frontal lobe of a brain in another human body... Your example also seems to emphasise the informational aspects of posthumanism, where the body-as-information is integrated into the programme of education. I like how the ‘course’ information changes in response to the corporeal data…who says knowledge can be disembodied? This is a fascinating technology Steph, and one that definitely questions the boundaries of the individual. It seems that, in allowing ‘the physician to monitor the patients and remotely alter the function of the device to increase functioning of the heart’, control of the body (previously allocated to the individuals brain stem?) is being ‘outsourced’ to a system that includes the device, and the frontal lobe of a brain in another human body…

Your example also seems to emphasise the informational aspects of posthumanism, where the body-as-information is integrated into the programme of education. I like how the ‘course’ information changes in response to the corporeal data…who says knowledge can be disembodied?

]]>
Comment on Posthuman Pedagogy by Siân Bayne http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/2011/11/27/posthuman-pedagogy/#comment-48 Siân Bayne Mon, 28 Nov 2011 13:52:57 +0000 http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/?p=100#comment-48 This is great stuff Steph, and I really like the way you are playing with the relationship between body, implant and device here - really clever. I think you would like Annemarie Mol's work on technology and medicine and her actor-network theory influenced ways of viewing them. If you had time to get hold of 'The body multiple: ontology in medical practice' (2002) I think you would get something from it. Great pedagogy anyway - thanks! This is great stuff Steph, and I really like the way you are playing with the relationship between body, implant and device here – really clever. I think you would like Annemarie Mol’s work on technology and medicine and her actor-network theory influenced ways of viewing them. If you had time to get hold of ‘The body multiple: ontology in medical practice’ (2002) I think you would get something from it.

Great pedagogy anyway – thanks!

]]>
Comment on Posthuman Pedagogy by Austin Tate http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/2011/11/27/posthuman-pedagogy/#comment-47 Austin Tate Mon, 28 Nov 2011 09:56:32 +0000 http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/?p=100#comment-47 This sort of think makes me queasy, but I think you have a great idea about providing support resources and education to assist people in using such devices and handling the psychological aspects of being dependent on such a device. This sort of think makes me queasy, but I think you have a great idea about providing support resources and education to assist people in using such devices and handling the psychological aspects of being dependent on such a device.

]]>
Comment on Micro-ethnography: TheGlobalWe by Siân Bayne http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/2011/11/10/micro-ethnography-theglobalwe/#comment-35 Siân Bayne Fri, 18 Nov 2011 09:12:00 +0000 http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/?p=55#comment-35 Steph, I enjoyed the way you used prezi to pull together fragments - a kind of bricolage - around your ethnographic themes - it was really nicely done. It's prompted a really interesting set of comments too, particularly around the ethical issues you raise. I'd agree with Jeremy that whether we think in terms of the internet as 'space' or 'text' does inflect how we approach questions of ethics. There's a nice paper by Bassett and O'Riordan in which they align the 'space' metaphor with the 'human subjects' research model, moving on to suggest we need to move beyond that and see internet spaces as partly textual, and partly a 'space' in which 'humans' interact - some good ties in with this week's theme there too. It's at: http://www.nyu.edu/projects/nissenbaum/ethics_bas_full.html if you fancy a read. Steph, I enjoyed the way you used prezi to pull together fragments – a kind of bricolage – around your ethnographic themes – it was really nicely done. It’s prompted a really interesting set of comments too, particularly around the ethical issues you raise. I’d agree with Jeremy that whether we think in terms of the internet as ‘space’ or ‘text’ does inflect how we approach questions of ethics. There’s a nice paper by Bassett and O’Riordan in which they align the ‘space’ metaphor with the ‘human subjects’ research model, moving on to suggest we need to move beyond that and see internet spaces as partly textual, and partly a ‘space’ in which ‘humans’ interact – some good ties in with this week’s theme there too. It’s at: http://www.nyu.edu/projects/nissenbaum/ethics_bas_full.html if you fancy a read.

]]>
Comment on Micro-ethnography: TheGlobalWe by Geraldine http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/2011/11/10/micro-ethnography-theglobalwe/#comment-32 Geraldine Wed, 16 Nov 2011 22:51:57 +0000 http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/?p=55#comment-32 Hi Steph, I'm only just getting around to exploring everyone's ethnographies and very much enjoying discovering something interesting with every new click! Your discussion of the ethical implications of lurking and covert reporting certainly got me thinking about how I approached my mini ethnography. I will go back and try to unpick the ethics in my own context. You also made me think about the balance of on/off line interactions and how the community might be shaped by this balance. The nature of the connections in the GlobalWe seemed high level - communicating a sense of shared beliefs in environmental activism perhaps. However in contrast the connections in Ania's #eltchat seem much more specific and oriented to day to day issues of ELT. An interesting comparison perhaps? I really like your prezi too! Thanks :) Hi Steph,

I’m only just getting around to exploring everyone’s ethnographies and very much enjoying discovering something interesting with every new click! Your discussion of the ethical implications of lurking and covert reporting certainly got me thinking about how I approached my mini ethnography. I will go back and try to unpick the ethics in my own context. You also made me think about the balance of on/off line interactions and how the community might be shaped by this balance. The nature of the connections in the GlobalWe seemed high level – communicating a sense of shared beliefs in environmental activism perhaps. However in contrast the connections in Ania’s #eltchat seem much more specific and oriented to day to day issues of ELT. An interesting comparison perhaps?
I really like your prezi too! Thanks :)

]]>
Comment on Micro-ethnography: TheGlobalWe by Grace Elliott http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/2011/11/10/micro-ethnography-theglobalwe/#comment-21 Grace Elliott Mon, 14 Nov 2011 15:34:20 +0000 http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/?p=55#comment-21 Hi Stephanie, I think this was quite a brave decision, choosing a group you know personally. I did wonder if someone would choose to do their ethnography on 'our community'. I can't add to the comments already made by Jeremy and Ania except to say that I liked that you found the 'virtual' persona is similar to the 'real life' one. And it's great that this task has been of use to you in your work. Hi Stephanie,

I think this was quite a brave decision, choosing a group you know personally. I did wonder if someone would choose to do their ethnography on ‘our community’.

I can’t add to the comments already made by Jeremy and Ania except to say that I liked that you found the ‘virtual’ persona is similar to the ‘real life’ one. And it’s great that this task has been of use to you in your work.

]]>
Comment on Micro-ethnography: TheGlobalWe by Austin Tate http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/2011/11/10/micro-ethnography-theglobalwe/#comment-20 Austin Tate Mon, 14 Nov 2011 10:58:51 +0000 http://edc11.education.ed.ac.uk/stephaniec/?p=55#comment-20 Stephanie, thanks for posting the observations on this community. It was interesting to see observations based on a community where you had real connections with some of those involved... and the points that arose due to this special apsect. Stephanie, thanks for posting the observations on this community. It was interesting to see observations based on a community where you had real connections with some of those involved… and the points that arose due to this special apsect.

]]>